• World first brain surgery performed on kakapo

    World first brain surgery performed on kakapo Author NZ Herald, Section Science, Publish Date Saturday, 11 May 2019, 10:47a.m. Kakapo chick Espy-1B had brain surgery to correct a deformity. (Photo / Supplied) Life was on a knife edge for kakapo chick Espy-1B, a bird whose species lives on the brink

  • Nature loss: Major report to highlight ‘natural and human emergency’

    Nature loss: Major report to highlight ‘natural and human emergency’ By Matt McGrathEnvironment correspondent Image copyright Getty IMAGES Scientists and government officials meet this week in Paris to finalize a key assessment on humanity’s relationship with nature. The Intergovernmental Panel for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, or IPBES, will issue the first report

  • How inland waters ‘breathe’ carbon—and what it means for global systems

    How inland waters ‘breathe’ carbon—and what it means for global systems by Yale University While concentrations of greenhouse gases tend to be higher in wetland streams than in forested streams, those flatter, calmer waters are less likely to release those gases into the atmosphere. Credit: Kelly Aho For a long time,

  • An Elusive Whale Is Found All Around the World

    Researchers are learning about a newly identified species of baleen whales, tracing sightings and sounds to learn that they stay mainly in tropical waters. An Omura’s whale in waters off Madagascar in the Indian Ocean.CreditGabriel Barathieu/Biosphoto, via Alamy ImageAn Omura’s whale in waters off Madagascar in the Indian Ocean.CreditCreditGabriel Barathieu/Biosphoto,

  • New research suggests living near protected areas can have positive impacts on human well-being

    New research suggests living near protected areas can have positive impacts on human well-being by Michelle Klampe, Oregon State University Tourists in Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Credit: Robin Naidoo Living near a protected area can improve aspects of human well-being across the developing world, new research published today in Science Advances suggests. Protected

  • California Dungeness crab industry to stop fishing 3 months early in legal settlement to end whale, turtle entanglements

    California Dungeness crab industry to stop fishing 3 months early in legal settlement to end whale, turtle entanglements Preliminary numbers for 2018 show the number of whales found wrapped in fishing gear, nets and crab pots along the West Coast again is increasing. (Photo courtesy of Tackaberry/Flynn via Cascasia Research

  • Dolphins poisoned by algae also showed signs of Alzheimer’s-like brain disease

    ENVIRONMENT Dolphins poisoned by algae also showed signs of Alzheimer’s-like brain disease BY JENNY STALETOVIC MARCH 20, 2019 02:00 PM, UPDATED MARCH 20, 2019 07:55 PM Jeff Greene, candid By Charles Trainor, Jr. Toxins produced by blue-green algae that have increasingly polluted Florida waters have been found in dead dolphins that

  • Vanishing chimpanzee cultures and the need to save animal knowledge

    DAILY SCIENCE Vanishing chimpanzee cultures and the need to save animal knowledge by Brandon Keim | Mar 20, 2019 In the early 1970s, primatologists made the first modern scientific descriptions of culture among chimpanzees. It was a controversial observation: most scientists had regarded culture, or the transmission of knowledge between individuals through social

  • Animal cultures matter for conservation

    Animal cultures matter for conservation Philippa Brakes, Sasha R. X. Dall, Lucy M. Aplin, Stuart Bearhop, Emma L. Carroll, Paolo Ciucci, Vicki Fishlock, John K. B. Ford, Ellen C. Garland, Sally A. Keith, Peter K. McGregor, Sarah L. Mesnick, Michael J. Noad, Giuseppe Notarbartolo di Sciara, Martha M. Robbins, Mark

  • Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Are Turning Up in Puget Sound Marine Life

    A small initial survey of marine mammals in Washington State’s Puget Sound shows a high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Photo by Norbert Wu/Minden Pictures Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Are Turning Up in Puget Sound Marine Life Researchers suspect human factors—such as wastewater runoff—may play a role. Authored by by Hannah Thomasy March 4,